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Multicultural Literature [clear filter]
Friday, October 12
 

3:00pm EDT

Not Your Momma's English Class: Fostering a Culture and Love of Literacy
As English teachers, we want to do it all: promote student growth and academic achievement, close the gap, individualize instruction, and promote a love of reading. Too often though, those goals feel overwhelming and mutually exclusive. In response, we continue digging in to literacy instruction the exact same way our teachers did, and the exact same way their teachers did- textbook anthologies, whole-class texts, and worksheet after worksheet. 

But what if there really was a way to do it all? What if you could foster a love of reading in students while promoting other academic goals? Learn about how to implement research based practices in your classroom, and most of all, get students excited about reading! This session will provide an overview of academic research about independent reading and the need for the change in pedagogy. In addition, this session will offer modeled practices for connecting readers with texts through digital surveys, book talks, and book tastings. Resources will also be provided so that teachers feel confident about monitoring students' reading skills and comprehension in this individualized approach to the English classroom (one-on-one reading conferences, writing about reading, etc.).

Speakers
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Danielle Fowler

Teacher- 7th Grade, Forest Middle School- Bedford County Schools
I am an English teacher in Bedford, VA. This is my sixth year teaching. I have taught in suburban, urban, and rural schools, including high school, middle school, and alternative school.


Friday October 12, 2018 3:00pm - 3:50pm EDT
Salon B 2801 Hershberger Road, Roanoke, VA 24017

4:00pm EDT

The Hate U Give and All American Boys: Multi-Genre Projects with a Focus on Theme and Voice
The Hate U Give and All American Boys: Multi-Genre Projects with a Focus on Theme and Voice

Objectives: 
To show utilizing technology Literature-Based Multi-Genre Projects based on a High School English Methods Assignment in a graduate course. 
To model theme and voice in multi-genre writing
To lead a workshop in theme and voice in multi-genre writing
To create a multi-genre writing piece using theme and voice in writing

Format: Technology Presentation using the Internet and Doc Cam as well as a 15-minute writing workshop.

Activities: The presenters will ask the audience to write a personal multi-genre writing piece to connect with theme and voice in multi-genre writing.

Strands: Adolescent Literature, Writing, Multicultural

Audience: Middle, High School, and College Professors

Resources and Materials: Examples of Multi-Genre Projects based on novels such as
The Hate U Give, Beowulf, All American Boys, and Hamilton

What will participants get out of the session? Participants will leave the workshop with 
samples of literature-based multi-genre projects. Next, the presenters will lead a writing workshop focused on voice and theme in writing. How do you place your voice in your literature based multi-genre project? Examples of voice and theme in multi-genre writing will be highlighted.

Speakers
MB

Mary Beth Cancienne

Professor, James Madison University
Dr. Cancienne is a Professor of English Education in the Middle and Secondary Education Department in the College of Education. She teaches courses in high school English methods and accompanying high school practicum, Curriculum and Co-curriculum, Foundations of American Education... Read More →


Friday October 12, 2018 4:00pm - 4:50pm EDT
Salon C 2801 Hershberger Road, Roanoke, VA 24017
 
Saturday, October 13
 

2:00pm EDT

Project LIT Community: Empowering Readers and Leaders in Schools and Communities
This session will introduce teachers to the Project LIT Community, a grassroots literacy movement that is sweeping through middle schools and high school across the nation, and describe the process of starting a Project LIT chapter at a high school. Participants will learn about the movement, its aims, and ways in which they can not only start Project LIT chapters in their own schools but also be supported in those endeavors. The session will be primarily lecture with a question and answer period; however, given a longer presentation time, there could be a chance for more interactive and audience participation by letting them experience what an actual Project LIT Book Club session is like, including discussion and trivia. The intended audience for this presentation is middle school and high school teachers, librarians, and administrators. Strands addressed include Young Adult Literature and Multicultural Literature. Presenters will project a prepared presentation to accompany their session. Participants will gain an introduction to or greater understanding of the Project LIT Community and learn ways to start their own chapter—including fundraising and service opportunities as well as strategies to run book clubs—and support students as they grow as readers and leaders.

Speakers
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Lisa Newman

English Teacher; Lead Teacher, Blacksburg High School
Lisa Newman is in her 23rd year of teaching. She graduated from Radford University with a BS in English and Secondary Education. She teaches at Blacksburg High School. A passionate social justice educator, she is the Department Lead Teacher, sponsors the Black Awareness Club, leads... Read More →
avatar for Josh Thompson

Josh Thompson

English Teacher, Blacksburg High School
A passionate antiracist and social justice educator, I teach English at Blacksburg High School where I strive to make my classroom a more equitable, inclusive space for liberation.


Saturday October 13, 2018 2:00pm - 2:50pm EDT
Salon B 2801 Hershberger Road, Roanoke, VA 24017

3:00pm EDT

Teaching Nonfiction, Teaching Diversity: Fostering Understanding and Empathy with Nonfiction and Texts from Different Cultural Traditions
We live in an era of rich diversity in books for young readers, when we can choose more fine books for any level, K-12, than ever before. The phenomenonal success of Linda Sue Park’s A Long Walk to Water attests to the impact that books can have, prompting young readers across the United States to raise money for wells in Africa. In addition to furnishing a gripping story, two salient factors in the book’s success are its ability to spark empathy for those in other countries and the real-world story at its heart. Moving beyond the boundaries established by canonical fictional texts can pose some challenging questions about choice: how many diverse texts to choose, what role nonfiction plays, whether to balance canonical texts with more contemporary texts, whether to choose texts that movies have been based on, how often to push students out of their comfort zone with texts they might not choose for themselves. 
In this session, presenters will discuss their experiences teaching diverse children’s and YA literature, including nonfiction and graphic novels as well as traditional fiction, in a college setting. They will share text suggestions and assignments based on these texts as well as invite discussion and books/assignment recommendations from those who attend.

Speakers
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Sam Hamilton

Assistant Professor of English, Bridgewater College
Dr. Sam Hamilton teaches writing courses and Literature of the Black Experience at Bridgewater College.
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Ashley Lauro

Instructor of English, Bridgewater College
Prof. Ashley Lauro teaches Children's Literature and writing courses at Bridgewater College.


Saturday October 13, 2018 3:00pm - 3:50pm EDT
Salon B 2801 Hershberger Road, Roanoke, VA 24017